INTERIOR LANDSCAPE SERIES

These sculptures were a continuation of the Structured Dolmen series of exterior sight specific sculptures, but taken into the gallery.

LANDSCAPE NO. 4

1983
Wood products, architectural glass, light
h. 6’, l. 24’, w. 36’

Exhibited: ‘Raume und Installationen’
Kunstler aus Kanada,
Wurttembergischer Kunstverein
Stuttgart, Germany

ETHIOPIAN LANDSCAPE

1981
Wood products, architectural glass, light
h. 8’, l. 33’, w. 26’
Exhibited: Charles H. Scott Gallery, ECIAD, Vancouver

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Brittany Landscape & Ethiopian Landscape

These two sculptures were presented concurrently as a collaboration between the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Charles H. Scott Gallery of the Emily Carr College of Art and Design.

Ethiopian landscape referred to the underground churches in that African country, which were cut out of the natural rock and have their roofs level with the surrounding land. Brittany Landscape was sequential with Ethiopian landscape and used the pre-Celtic ceremonial sites of Brittany in Northern France as its inspiration.

He says, “I consider the symbols of the cross and the alter in these sculptures as metaphors for the human quest for spiritual wisdom: desirable and fragile but, more importantly, almost unobtainable.”

BRITTANY LANDSCAPE

1981
Wood products, architectural glass, light
h. 6’ 6 ‘, l. 49’, w. 30’
Exhibited: The Vancouver Art Gallery

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Brittany Landscape & Ethiopian Landscape

These two sculptures were presented concurrently as a collaboration between the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Charles H. Scott Gallery of the Emily Carr College of Art and Design.

Ethiopian landscape referred to the underground churches in that African country, which were cut out of the natural rock and have their roofs level with the surrounding land. Brittany Landscape was sequential with Ethiopian landscape and used the pre-Celtic ceremonial sites of Brittany in Northern France as its inspiration.

He says, “I consider the symbols of the cross and the alter in these sculptures as metaphors for the human quest for spiritual wisdom: desirable and fragile but, more importantly, almost unobtainable.”

SLIGHT SLOPE

1980
Wood, architectural glass, plasterboard, light
unit a: h. 9’, l. 42’ 6”, w. 28’
unit b: h. 8’ 6”, l. 28’, w. 25’
Exhibited: ‘The Winnipeg Perspectives 1980’. The Winnipeg Art Gallery, Manitoba

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Sight Slope, which Cogswell exhibited in the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s ‘Winnipeg Perspective Sites’ exhibition in 1980, was the first in this interior series. In place of the hillside , grass , concrete and steel materials of the exterior works, he used a wooden structure, grid work, architectural glass and light. The forms, components and visual language were consistent with the exterior explorations. The simple wedges of the hillside, the graphic divisions of the surfaces used as large multi media drawings, the cave like openings and the parallel beams were all elements that he had used for some time.

In the earlier, exterior, works such as Long Barrow 6 he had hoped to build structures suggestive of timeless references to sanctified spaces and no longer present cultures. Sight Slope takes those ideas into the Gallery by using the idea of a typical chapel that would have been built in the interior of a European cathedral.